Nikon and GOM scanners

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philosophical
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Nikon and GOM scanners

Post by philosophical » Thu Aug 15, 2019 10:20 pm

Hi there,

I was wondering if anyone here is using scanners for metrology. It seems like this forum is mostly for lower accuracy scanners but I am trying to find some info about scanners to suppliment a CMM machine.

GOM and Nikon make scanners that they claim are capable of approx 5 micron accuracy, however its difficult to find info about the Nikon and I was hoping to find someone on here that might be using one.

the Nikon mahcine I am looking at is the LC15Dx
and the GOM unit is the Gom Capsule

Regards,

Phil

JSenior
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Re: Nikon and GOM scanners

Post by JSenior » Fri Aug 16, 2019 7:05 am

Hi Phil,

We have an LC15Dx installed on our LK CMM.

We don't have any GOM scanners but we do have eviXscan structured light scanners which are comparable.
For an automated solution we'll be getting one of these installed next month: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEHNgxR ... vatronixSA

Happy to try and answer any questions you have.

James

philosophical
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Re: Nikon and GOM scanners

Post by philosophical » Fri Aug 16, 2019 3:32 pm

Thats fantastic to hear, thank you for replying!
The Nikon we are looking to purchase is actually the LC15Dx, so Im very excited to hear about your experiences with it.

We have a nice Mitutoyo strato-apex that it will be going onto if we decide to purchase it.

So how do you like using the scanner and what software do you use?

Nikon claims that it will adjust to ambient lighting and it doesn't matter what the surface finish is. does that stand up in the real world?

how accurate is it and what do you use it for?

JSenior
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Re: Nikon and GOM scanners

Post by JSenior » Tue Aug 20, 2019 6:36 am

FIrstly the data that it produces is the best that I have ever seen on any scanner. I don't have particularly interesting scans that I'm allowed to share but I've attached a picture of scanning the top surface of a magnetic chuck, where you can see clearly small areas of corrosion and scratches etc.

You have to calibrate the laser to the material which takes 20 seconds or so. Highly reflective surfaces and chrome aren't a problem for it (it handles them much better than certain other scanners which claim they can.)

Ambient light doesn't seem to be a problem. We have dimmable lighting in our inspection room for other scanners but it doesn't seem to be required for the Nikon.

It struggles a bit with internal 90 degree corners (no radii) with overscan.

The reason we don't use it for everything is that setup is slow. The basic process is to choose the head angle and then program the path.
With the jog controller you need to set the height and then you can select start and finish points for a pass. You can then move the head up/down and select a third point to fill in a grid of points.
If you have the nominal CAD then it's slightly quicker as once it is aligned you can select an area on the CAD that requires scanning and the software will workout the head height changes.
With more complicated parts you will need to go over the same areas 5+ times to get all the angles.
The laser width only being 15-20mm wide also makes things slow. (Depending on your requirements the L100 may be worth a look as a happier medium speed and accuracy.)

If we don't require the resolution/accuracy and it's not a multiple repeat part then we would use a Faro arm/structured light scanner as they are a lot faster.

For software we use CAMIO and the scan data is meshed/reported in the Nikon Focus software which is pretty good.
LCD15x.2.png
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