The meaning of MPts

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Tri Luan
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The meaning of MPts

Post by Tri Luan » Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:40 am

Hi,
I have a confusing problem and need your help. Before scanning we usually set technical parameters such as Resolution, Quality... When we finish setting then the Resolution parameter changes to Mpts parameter " Resolution 1/4 -> 43.7 Mpts". I don't understand the meaning of Mpts and how the rule does scanner convert to Mpts from the Resolution? ( I knew the Resolution is points which are picked up by scanner)
Best regards
Luan

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TommyMaddox
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Re: The meaning of MPts

Post by TommyMaddox » Thu Jun 07, 2018 5:04 am

Hi,

Mpts= Million Points. 43.7 Mpts is 43.7 million points.

Please PM me if you have any other questions,

madgic
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Re: The meaning of MPts

Post by madgic » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:32 am

Tri,

It can be confusing, especially as in outdoor environments that would drop to almost 1/3 of those points. To be honest it's better to try and work out angular distance, and then vertical and horizontal surface point spacing at 5m and 10m. Once you've worked it out for a scanner, then you'll be able to confidently using the resolution settings in any environment and know that your point spacing will be sufficient regardless of overlap.

When we're training Police Surveyors, we teach then how to do this and apply it practically.

Tri Luan
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Re: The meaning of MPts

Post by Tri Luan » Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:37 pm

TommyMaddox wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 5:04 am
Hi,

Mpts= Million Points. 43.7 Mpts is 43.7 million points.

Please PM me if you have any other questions,
Hi TommyMaddox,
Thanks for your help so much. But I still confuse and wanna clarify. Following your meaning when we set resolution 1/4 then after finishing scan we will have total 43.7 milion points for one scan position!
Could you help me to understand this issue?

Tri Luan
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Re: The meaning of MPts

Post by Tri Luan » Thu Jun 07, 2018 4:42 pm

madgic wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:32 am
Tri,

It can be confusing, especially as in outdoor environments that would drop to almost 1/3 of those points. To be honest it's better to try and work out angular distance, and then vertical and horizontal surface point spacing at 5m and 10m. Once you've worked it out for a scanner, then you'll be able to confidently using the resolution settings in any environment and know that your point spacing will be sufficient regardless of overlap.

When we're training Police Surveyors, we teach then how to do this and apply it practically.
Hi madgic,
I appreciate your response so much.
I don't understand meaning of this sentence" in outdoor environments that would drop to almost 1/3 of those points". Could you explain it to me?

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Re: The meaning of MPts

Post by 3DForensics » Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:18 pm

Hi Tri,

The Mpts is the maximum number of points you would get if you were to imagine yourself scanning inside a big closed box. there would be a point that exists everywhere that the laser hits and records a surface measurement.

When you are in an outdoor environment, you won't capture anything in the sky or where the laser doesn't provide a return. For example, along the roadway far away, the angle of incidence of the laser is quite low and points drop off.

When you unwrap the image in the planar view and if you were to count the number of points (similar to counting pixels in a jpg image), you would find it the same as the Mpts.

Does that make sense?

Eugene

Tri Luan
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Re: The meaning of MPts

Post by Tri Luan » Fri Jun 08, 2018 8:19 am

3DForensics wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 6:18 pm
Hi Tri,

The Mpts is the maximum number of points you would get if you were to imagine yourself scanning inside a big closed box. there would be a point that exists everywhere that the laser hits and records a surface measurement.

When you are in an outdoor environment, you won't capture anything in the sky or where the laser doesn't provide a return. For example, along the roadway far away, the angle of incidence of the laser is quite low and points drop off.

When you unwrap the image in the planar view and if you were to count the number of points (similar to counting pixels in a jpg image), you would find it the same as the Mpts.

Does that make sense?

Eugene
Hi 3DForensics,
Thank for your response so much. And now I understood this issue

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