tying the model, .dwgs, and scans together.

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vsamani
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tying the model, .dwgs, and scans together.

Post by vsamani »

Hello folks, I am new to this forum and found it as I was doing research (googling) to learn more on how I can tie in the model, dwgs and scans together as package to provide clients. I currently use the Faro Focus3D X330 scanner and using Scene as a platform. We started using the scanner for QC on concrete Slab on Grades and Camber for steel beams. I am trying to utilize the scanner more. I am slowly progressing and gain a bit of knowledge here and there but love to learn more from others who often use the scanner for most of their work. Any suggestions and help would be appreciated.



Regards,

Scott
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Re: tying the model, .dwgs, and scans together.

Post by Scott »

We seldom discuss the actual deliverables we assemble for our clients. We used to call these 'blueprints' --a roll of sequenced paper documents used by many (permit and planning agencies, contractors & subcontractors etc.) to get things built. The digital age has not replaced these paper documents on job sites, but I wonder how they are used presently? Blueprints are handy, can be annotated with pencil and pen, resistant to dusty conditions. Should our deliverables still be created to fit this traditional format (I would think so)? Laptops are rather delicate, small, and not as useful for viewing on typically chaotic job sites, yet that seems to be the direction we are going. I assume that my deliverables will end up as printed 'blueprints', but I doubt those in training programs for the AEC industry do. I prepare my scans for integration with traditional plan sets. The conventions of A/E drawings have been developed over many decades/centuries (plans, sections/elevations etc). I see little reason to abandon this mostly symbolic system, when scan data can simple add to it. 2D is still an important format (it gets things built). Your thoughts?

VXGrid
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Re: tying the model, .dwgs, and scans together.

Post by VXGrid »

Scott wrote:
Thu Oct 17, 2019 6:52 pm
We seldom discuss the actual deliverables we assemble for our clients. [...] The conventions of A/E drawings have been developed over many decades/centuries (plans, sections/elevations etc). I see little reason to abandon this mostly symbolic system, when scan data can simple add to it. 2D is still an important format (it gets things built). Your thoughts?
I see it similar, the point cloud is a nice to have and one can look up things in it, but it is rather an intermediate step than a final product (if your client isn't doing the modelling himself).
The end question is always: What are you going to build/change/manage with the data and in which form is it best suited. Nobody needs a computer with GigaBytes of point cloud on a construction site, when a blueprint/2D plan is sufficient and more easy to handle.

vsamani wrote:
Thu Oct 17, 2019 5:58 pm
Hello folks, I am new to this forum and found it as I was doing research (googling) to learn more on how I can tie in the model, dwgs and scans together as package to provide clients. I currently use the Faro Focus3D X330 scanner and using Scene as a platform. We started using the scanner for QC on concrete Slab on Grades and Camber for steel beams. I am trying to utilize the scanner more. I am slowly progressing and gain a bit of knowledge here and there but love to learn more from others who often use the scanner for most of their work. Any suggestions and help would be appreciated.

Regards,
If you want to combine the data, then do it in the application type of your customer (if he is using ArchiCAD, create an ArchiCAD project with everything, the same for the other applications).
In my opinion it would be more effecient to just send it separated, since the data size and world space is so different (2D CAD vs 3D BIM vs 3D point cloud), but don't listen to me, listen to your customers what they like to get from you!

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Re: tying the model, .dwgs, and scans together.

Post by surveypm »

Working on manufacturing projects using BIM for production line changes projects I have been involved with use laser scans of the existing conditions as a basis which sometimes is 3D modeled to document the as-built condition. That form typically is derived from a SCENE scan project into Recap with any 3D CAD as-built in either 3D AutoCAD or Revit combined in Navisworks. From that basis changes are determined and identified with new or revised 3D models added to Navisworks. Any necessary 2D documents are typically an output of the 3D models. Often legacy 2D record prints from the owner are used as underlayment to the 3D Navisworks federated model for a check from past records to current and intended post-project conditions. All laser scans, 2D, and 3D files are coordinated by the owner’s building coordinate system so they drop together like Legos.

Navisworks is primarily used because many manufacturing machinery is typically designed in Solidworks, Solid Edge, or some other machine design software. Navisworks is great for integrating this different design content. It handles a lot of different file formats. SCENE also has a tools to isolate critical machinery interfaces where tight coordinates are necessary; approximately +/- 1/8” and can illustrate the "picture" of the issues very well, often better than just the point cloud.

It’s a great way to bring all this data together and verify clashes or misses in design prior to construction as well as a good way to get construction input early in the project. In many cases working with a progressive engineering and construction team a significant reduction in documentation is achieved using a federated model. In fact many projects have a Knaack gang box in the field equipped with a computer, the model, and any related information. Navisworks models can also be easily used in the field on tablets like a MS Surface. Such digital content has delivered significant reduction in project cost and schedules in my experience, but you need folks who have adopted digital capability and know how to apply it properly.

You might want to check out Bimforum.org for more info and research BIM execution plans. This content and process is gaining more acceptance among more companies.

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