Here they come--perhaps with a Brooklyn Bridge!

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Scott
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Here they come--perhaps with a Brooklyn Bridge!

Post by Scott »

https://www.directindustry.com/prod/hi- ... 60185.html
Hi-Target- About Us:
Established since 1999, Hi-Target is the first professional high-precision surveying and mapping instrument manufacturer and solution provider to be successfully listed in China. Hi-Target produces a wide range of surveying equipment including GNSS receivers, CORS stations, TPS, 3D Laser Scanners,...
Mapping system - HS series - Hi-Target Surveying Instrument Co.,Ltd Contact directly:
Hi-Target Surveying Instrument Co.,Ltd China

HS Series high-precision 3D terrestrial laser scanner is completely self-developed by Hi-Target with pulsed type, full-waveform, high-precision and high-frequency, supporting the whole process...
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Re: Here they come--perhaps with a Brooklyn Bridge!

Post by TommyMaddox »

I knew this day was coming, but I must admit I didn't think it would be so soon. I was estimating 2022-2025 before the first crappy chinese terrestrial scanners start to become available.

It looks like this company has done nothing but copy Riegl and Trimble products, just like that other company ScanTech that appears to have copied the entire Creaform product line.

I think it is extremely important not to underestimate the incoming waves that these announcements are signalling. Once the pricing starts to plummet, I suspect it will become difficult for providers to make a living especially in areas where there is a lot of competition already.
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Re: Here they come--perhaps with a Brooklyn Bridge!

Post by Scott »

I knew this day was coming, but I must admit I didn't think it would be so soon. I was estimating 2022-2025 before the first crappy chinese terrestrial scanners start to become available. ~Tommy

In all fairness, China was traditionally known for its luxury goods (silk, porcelain (aka 'china'), tea, etc.), and notable inventions: paper, movable type, magnetic compass, mechanical clock, paper money, iron smelting https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_C ... inventions. There is no reason to assume that they will not excel in the future. Japanese and Korean products were treated much the same in the 20th century, but that all changed, too (rather quickly)--just ask Leica (Leitz). I expect a mix of quality & poor instruments to emerge. I wish the USA would fully adopt the Metric system...it's embarrassing (our currency was the first to go decimal, after all). Competition is tough...bring it on...

Good interview with Noam Chomsky:https://www.truthdig.com/articles/noam- ... -dystopia/
"The U.S. multinationals are losing our jobs. But we don’t want China to develop as an economy. That’s why the bipartisan programs are to attack China from doing the things that make the economy successful–like industrial policy, to have a state industrial policy. We see that that’s successful; we want them to stop it. Kind of interesting, because that’s–economists and others, if they believe a word they’re saying, ought to be cheering. According to their theories, if the state intervenes in the economy, it’s going to harm the economy. But everyone knows the opposite is true. In fact, we ourselves have a massive state industrial policy. That’s why you have things like computers and the internet and so on, it’s mainly public funding. But we don’t want China to have that, because they’ll be successful, they’ll be out of our control; that we don’t want. That’s what the kind of concern was in the fifties. So I think the imperial model has been very successful. It’s led to a situation in which it’s primarily designed for the benefit of U.S. capital, which has succeeded beyond belief."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... ina-ascent
This decade belonged to China. So will the next one ~Martin Jacques
"Far from this being a product of copying, the Chinese are increasingly engaging in groundbreaking innovation: China accounted for almost half of all patent filings in the world last year. But why should we be surprised? People living in a country growing at 10% per annum for 35 years and between 6% and 8% for the past decade are used to rapid change and constant innovation. And don’t forget that China is an extraordinarily rich and intellectually endowed civilization that has always been hugely committed to learning and education."
Last edited by Scott on Sun Jan 12, 2020 7:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Here they come--perhaps with a Brooklyn Bridge!

Post by TommyMaddox »

Scott wrote: Fri Jan 10, 2020 12:53 am In all fairness, China was traditionally known for its luxury goods (silk, porcelain (aka 'china'), tea, etc.), and notable inventions: paper, movable type, magnetic compass, mechanical clock, paper money, iron smelting https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_C ... inventions. There is no reason to assume that they will not excel in the future. Japanese and Korean products were treated much the same in the 20th century, but that all changed, too (rather quickly)--just ask Leica (Leitz). I expect a mix of quality & poor instruments to emerge. I wish the USA would fully adopt the Metric system...it's embarrassing (our currency was the first to go decimal, after all). Competition is tough...bring it on...
I'm not going to disagree with you on previous innovations over the last thousand years, but I think the context of the last 30-40 is what I'm primarily focused on, and of course the present times are the critical ones. FWIW I prefer to design and model in metric or metric inch hybrid, but yes it always remains hard for me to judge distances and real life items in metric vs imperial.
On the topic at hand, I think I would have more respect for the products if they were anything other than shameless ripoffs of actual innovations that have almost always taken place elsewhere in the world from other companies.
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Re: Here they come--perhaps with a Brooklyn Bridge!

Post by Wdigman - Europe »

Interesting Read.

Yes, new and cheaper products are coming. Is the scanner in your cellphone working yet?

The scanner illustrated here is half to one quarter the capabilities of a Faro or the RTC360. 8-100mm accuracy 500,000 points per second. Its a scanner from 8 years ago in a new form factor. I know of a company that did this in India, all parts are off the shelf, will it come to full production?

The thing is since 2000 when I started, the process to collect data has become easier and easier. Whole markets are now "Closed" due to competition. Once the tech was accepted more and more people got into the game, the price dropped and us veterans had to change or find something else to do. Scanners have improved by becoming faster, smaller, less noise, and more user friendly in the last 10 years. The next 10 we will likely see the price of the Leica's and Faro's drop, creating new challenges. Scanners can only go so fast that its no longer noticeable and the accuracy really wont need to be less then where it is now. We are fast approaching 1mm accuracy for static, how much more will you or your clients pay for that extra 1mm accuracy? China and India will someday soon build a knock off RTC360 that is just as good... What will the price be? This will be the reality for drones and mobile scanning as well.

What we cannot forget is the VALUE trained persons who know how to use these machines bring to a project. Scanning is a lot more than setting up a scanner and pressing go on the screen. If service providers forget their value then it truly becomes a race to the bottom; a reverse auction where everyone looses!
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