Scanning on Ships

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kendecamp
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Scanning on Ships

Post by kendecamp » Fri Jan 09, 2009 4:40 am

Anyone have any good ideas regarding scanning on ships in dry dock, that might sway a tad while in dock? I'm guessing you can turn the compensator off and go to work. Also, anyone have any good ideas on getting coordinates around the different areas of a ship? A naval architect/engineer I was chatting with was wondering how we could start from the outside of the ship on the dock and move our way down the narrow stair wells and through different angles of the ship to near the bottom. I have no idea what size the ship is...I think he was speaking in general terms. I've worked in tight areas on oil platforms and in offices, but it seems like it would be more difficult to get around a ship with the limited lines of sight. Any general ideas would be greatly appreciated!

My Scanner is a SS2

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Matt Young
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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by Matt Young » Fri Jan 09, 2009 12:17 pm

I would think about using an HDS6000 instead of the SS2 because that will minimize scan times for each setup. I would also want to think about some sort of magnetic or fixed base for the scanhead and turn off the compensator. Use at least three, ideally four co-incident scan targets between each scanworld (black and white targets can be pasted all over the ship first. this way you can register the whole thing on the targets without need for a second instrument.

Using this method, the scanner will move with the ship and and everything should work. You will not be able to compensate for any twist in the ship.

If the ship is in dry dock then it should not sway. How big is it?

We have scanned ships in dry dock and produced very detailed models and drawings for them. If you require any of our experienced CAD staff to help on this then let me know.
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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by pollete » Fri Jan 09, 2009 12:35 pm

Might sound I'm pulling your leg but, why dont drill the boat! :lol: and then use some targets that you could insert in the holes from both sides.
Perhaps it was not that insane idea if there is a good way to fix three or four small holes.

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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by BOOM » Fri Jan 09, 2009 12:46 pm

we scanned a ferry and we didn't have to drill holes in it. :lol:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x368iiYHPW0[/youtube]

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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by kendecamp » Fri Jan 09, 2009 9:15 pm

I have no idea how big the ship is. He was just picking my brain, since he's an engineer and is prone to that. He does work on fishing vessels, ferry's and the like.

Thanks for the pic...that looks like you did a pretty bang up job.

I don't think we can drill holes...although we did joke about that.

I'll get back with you all if I have I have any other info to share.

Thanks!

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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by cygnus6 » Thu Mar 19, 2009 11:54 am

We also have done some yacht scannings, in the picture you can see a section from a 72m yacht. There were spesific rooms and decks that the client wanted us to scan so we didn't scan the whole yacht. However the client wanted to see them all together.We used both magnetic and tilt and turn targets to help with the small stair areas - and to keep the whole database in the same coordinate system we used a total station to give coordinates to targets. We tried to have at least 3 common targets among the scans but where it was not possible, we just used the total station coordinates. That way we didn't do any unnecessary scans. This helped a lot in the stairways, we didn't have to setup the scanner on the narrow stairways just to have a common target for the registration. You also must remember to work in the close range mode for the really close parts.
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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by Matt Young » Thu Mar 19, 2009 12:02 pm

cygnus6,

Nice work.
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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by kendecamp » Thu Mar 19, 2009 1:19 pm

What is close range mode? I've never heard that term used.

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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by stevenramsey » Thu Mar 19, 2009 1:28 pm

Close range mode on HDS6000 and Imager 5006 means that the power output from the scanner is reduced to allow for very close objects to be scanned. It reduces the range but thats not a issue indoors.
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kendecamp
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Re: Scanning on Ships

Post by kendecamp » Thu Mar 19, 2009 6:02 pm

oh, okay. I was curious because I believe I ran into something odd with the SS2 the other day, while scanning some dull gray vertical structural beams. It appeared that the beam was slightly bent, near where the top window scanned compared to the lower window. Have you seen that before? It was about 5 feet away. After a site visit, the beam was not bent as the scan suggested.

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