RIEGL LMS-Z420i monitoring the wreck of Costa Concordia

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joe.3dlm
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RIEGL LMS-Z420i monitoring the wreck of Costa Concordia

Post by joe.3dlm » Wed Feb 08, 2012 12:20 pm

(06.02.12)
Following the sinking of the cruise ship Costa Concordia (January 13th, 2012) at Isola des Giglio in Italy, the Italian Civil Protection Department appointed the Earth Sciences Department of the University of Firenze as responsible for a permanent laser scanning monitoring. The terrestrial laser scanning system RIEGL LMS-Z420i is currently employed to assess the movements of the shipwreck. In combination with other monitoring systems they contribute to the safety of the rescue and salvage team.
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Re: RIEGL LMS-Z420i monitoring the wreck of Costa Concordia

Post by Oatfedgoat » Thu Feb 09, 2012 8:03 am

I had wondered where they were getting the figures of 40mm movement in news reports.

An innovative(?) use of laser scanning in an unfortunate circumstance.

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Re: RIEGL LMS-Z420i monitoring the wreck of Costa Concordia

Post by stevenramsey » Fri Feb 10, 2012 9:07 am

How many monitoring systems do the need. A full blown GeoMoss and TM30 was set up within days. This has been sending back any movement in real time via the web text and email.
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Re: RIEGL LMS-Z420i monitoring the wreck of Costa Concordia

Post by Matt Young » Fri Feb 10, 2012 1:21 pm

Looking at the Riegle results I would say she is sitting on flat rock on her aft section and the forward section is on a slight overhang? Which would explain the higher degree of movement at that end of the ship during tides.
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Re: RIEGL LMS-Z420i monitoring the wreck of Costa Concordia

Post by joe.3dlm » Mon Feb 13, 2012 1:52 pm

stevenramsey wrote:How many monitoring systems do the need. A full blown GeoMoss and TM30 was set up within days. This has been sending back any movement in real time via the web text and email.
I'd suggest more systems are better.

We all know that laser scanning is complimentary to other forms of monitoring in this kind of situation - it's a different kind of measurement, granted, but it gives you information that you cannot get from a small number of discrete measurement locations (prisms, in this case) - for example, deformation maps of the entire deck of the ship at high resolution.

For this reason, a number of open pit mines are employing a number of methods to monitor and understand their highwalls - prism tracking (GeoMoS/Autoslope), laser scanning (SiteMonitor) and radar (GroundProbe/Reutech) - all of which complement their "traditional" equipment like extensiometers and seismographs (and not forgetting visual inspection!) and all of which tell you a different piece of information.

Joe

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